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Earth Expeditions Blog: Planning, Coordinating and Communicating – The Science Behind Winter Storm Chasing Experiments

02.25.2022
As the snowstorm headed through New York on February 24, one professor at Stony Brook University in Stony Brook, New York spent the hours leading up to it preparing his students to head right into the storm.

Earth Expeditions Blog: Storm Chasing Scientists Fly Into the Clouds to Understand Winter Snowstorms

02.23.2022
Imagine the feeling of flying on an airplane. Smooth sailing, clear skies, not a cloud in sight. It’s a relaxing ride that many take for work or recreational travel. Now imagine flying through clouds, with the turbulence of different intensities...

Earth Expeditions Blog: Up, up and away – Launching Balloons in a Blizzard

02.07.2022
Andrew Janiszeski and Troy Zaremba blow up a weather balloon in a dark hotel lobby. The weather was calm last night when they drove into Plymouth, Massachusetts, but this morning a blizzard is raging outside. Snow is piling up in the hotel parking lot, wind gusts are near 70mph, and the power is out – but they have a job to do...
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Overview

The mission of the Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Laboratory is to conduct research to understand the physics and dynamics of atmospheric processes through the use of satellite, aircraft and surface-based remote sensing observations and computer-based simulations. Key areas of investigation are cloud and precipitation systems and their environments from the scale of individual clouds and thunderstorms through mesoscale convective systems and cyclonic storms, and up to the scale of the impact of these systems on regional and global climate. The processes associated with the interaction of the atmosphere with the underlying land and ocean surfaces are also of high priority. Development of advanced remote-sensing instrumentation (including lidar, passive microwave and radar) and techniques to measure meteorological parameters in the troposphere is an important focus.
The Laboratory plays key science leadership roles in the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, launched in 2014, and the Earth System Observatory–Atmospheric Observing System (ESO–AOS) mission, which is being developed for launch in the late 2020s to address high-priority research topics tied to aerosols, clouds, and precipitation identified in the 2017 NASA Earth Science Decadal Survey.

For further information, data, research, and other resources, see Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Research.


Contact Us

George Huffman
301.614.6308
george.j.huffman@nasa.gov

General inquiries about the scientific programs at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center may be directed to the Center Office of Communications at 1.301.286.8955.

                                                                                                                                                                                        
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