Solar System Exploration Data Services Office

Thomas H Morgan

(Head)

 thomas.h.morgan@nasa.gov

 301.286.1743

Org Code: 690.1

NASA/GSFC
Mail Code: 690.1
Greenbelt, MD 20771

Employer: NASA

Brief Bio


My major focus for the last decade, as first Planetary Data System (PDS) project manager and currently office head of Goodard's Solar System Exploration Data Services office is ensuring that we have complete, searchable, secure archives of all of NASA's planetary mission data.  My research interests are exospheres and tails of Mercury and the Moon as seen by observing them at the sodium and potassium resonance lines.

Research Interests


My current research interests are observations of planetary exospheres, and scientific archiving.

Solar System: Mercury

Positions/Employment


National Research Council Post Doctoral Position

NRC/NAS - Lyndon Baines Johnson Space Center

January 1973 - December 1975

I worked on UV spectra of late type stars


Assistant Professor of Physics

Houston Baptist University - Houston Texas

January 1975 - August 1979

Houston Bptist University is a small liberal arts college in Texas.  over my period there, I taught introductory and advanced undergraduate physics courses, and courses for non-scientists.


Assistant Professor of Physics

Southwestern University - Georgetown Texas

September 1979 - June 1987

I taught most of the undergraduate physics curriculum and astronomy courses.  I was acting head of the physics department for 2 years.


Senior NRC Postdoctoral Position

NRC/NAS - Lyndon Baines Johnson Space Center

September 1987 - August 1989

During this period I observed the Na and K exospheres of Mercury and the Moon.


Visiting Senior Scientist NASA HQ

USRA - Washington DC

September 1989 - August 1991

Worked with Dr. Jurgen Rahe managing the planetary astronony program and early programmatic efforts to start NASA's Near Earth Objects program. I also assisted on other research management tasks.


Senior Scientist

Southwest Research Institute - San Antonio, Texas

September 1991 - September 2001

I worked on a number of areas, but continued my work on observations and analysis of the lunar and Mercurian exospheres.

For part of this period, I served as an IPA at NASA Headquarters.


Program Scientist and Program Executive

National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Planetary Science Division Science Mission Directorate NASA Headquarters Washington DC

September 2001 - March 2010

In this period, I served as New Frontiers Program Scientist, Program Scientsit for the NEOO program, Both Program Executive and Program Scientist ofr the Stardust mission and in many other capacities.


Project Manager PDS, Office Head SSESDO

code 690.1 Goddard Space Flight Center - Greenbelt Maryland

March 2010 - Present

Professional Societies


International Astronomical Union

1978 - Present


American Astronomical Society

1968 - Present

Selected Publications


Refereed

Killen, R. M., T. H. Morgan, A. E. Potter, et al. C. Plymate, R. Tucker, and J. D. Johnson. 2019. Coronagraphic observations of the lunar sodium exosphere January–June, 2017 Icarus [10.1016/j.icarus.2019.02.027]

Crichton, D., J. S. Hughes, S. Hardman, et al. E. Law, R. Beebe, T. Morgan, and E. Grezeck. 2014. A scalable planetary science information architecture for big science data”, IEEE 10th International Conference on e-Science IEEE 10th International Conference on e-Science 1 196-203

Potter, A., T. Morgan, and R. Killen. 2009. Sodium winds on Mercury Icarus 204 (2): 355-367 [10.1016/j.icarus.2009.06.028]