Vladimir Airapetian

Vladimir Airapetian

  • RESEARCH ASSOCIATE
  • 301.286.4014
  • NASA/GSFC
  • Mail Code: 671
  • Greenbelt , MD 20771
  • Employer: ADNET SYSTEMS INC
  • Brief Bio

    Dr. Vladimir Airapetian is a Senior Astrophysicist at Heliophysics Science Division (HSD) /NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and Research Professor at American University, DC. He is a PI of NASA NExSS project “Mission to Young Earth 2.0” and NASA Exobiology project on initiation of life on early Earth and Mars. He is also leading an interdisciplinary team of heliophysicists, astrophysicists, planetary scientists, chemists and biochemists from NASA Goddard, NASA Langley, Harvard University and Tokyo Tech to understand how extreme events from the active stars affect physics and chemistry of exoplanetary habitability. Vladimir Airapetian obtained a Bachelor in Science with major in Physics from the Yerevan State University and his PhD in theoretical astrophysics from Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory in Armenia. . He has over 20 years of experience in theoretical astrophysics, heliophysics and astrobiology. Dr. Airapetian specializes in the MHD modeling of solar and stellar winds, extreme coronal mass ejection events from the current and early Sun and their effects on Earth’s magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. His latest activity includes the application of state-of-the-art multidimensional heliophysics models to simulate environments of active stars and the young Sun to understand their impacts to the atmosphere of early Earth and Mars. These studies laid the foundation for the concept of initiation of biological molecules on early Earth and resolution of the Faint Young Sun’s paradox.

    Research Interests

    3D MHD Dynamics of Coronal Mass Ejections (CME) with Magnetospheres of Early and Current Earth

     

    Simulating a Prebiotic Chemistry With 2D GSFC atmospheric code

     

    2.5D MHD simulations of winds from cool evolved stars

    2.5D MHD simulations of solar coronal streamers

    Solar Coronal Heating

    Developing synthetic models for solar active regions

    Photon Sieve Solar/stellar Telescope Design

    Teaching Experience

    208-2014  Research Associate Professor at George Mason University

    Teaching Introductory Astronomy course, ASTR 111 and ASTR 113 
    Online Astronomy Courses at Capella University

    Professional Societies

    Full Member of SPD/AAS and International Astronomical Union, 2012 - Present

    Brief Bio

    Dr. Vladimir Airapetian is a Senior Astrophysicist at Heliophysics Science Division (HSD) /NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center and Research Professor at American University, DC. He is a PI of NASA NExSS project “Mission to Young Earth 2.0” and NASA Exobiology project on initiation of life on early Earth and Mars. He is also leading an interdisciplinary team of heliophysicists, astrophysicists, planetary scientists, chemists and biochemists from NASA Goddard, NASA Langley, Harvard University and Tokyo Tech to understand how extreme events from the active stars affect physics and chemistry of exoplanetary habitability. Vladimir Airapetian obtained a Bachelor in Science with major in Physics from the Yerevan State University and his PhD in theoretical astrophysics from Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory in Armenia. . He has over 20 years of experience in theoretical astrophysics, heliophysics and astrobiology. Dr. Airapetian specializes in the MHD modeling of solar and stellar winds, extreme coronal mass ejection events from the current and early Sun and their effects on Earth’s magnetosphere, ionosphere and thermosphere. His latest activity includes the application of state-of-the-art multidimensional heliophysics models to simulate environments of active stars and the young Sun to understand their impacts to the atmosphere of early Earth and Mars. These studies laid the foundation for the concept of initiation of biological molecules on early Earth and resolution of the Faint Young Sun’s paradox.

                                                                                                                                                                                            
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