Dr. Scott A Braun

Dr. Scott A Braun

  • Additional Roles: RESEARCH METEOROLOGIST, Project Scientist for Global Precipitation Measurement
  • 301.614.6316 | 301.614.5492
  • NASA/GSFC
  • Mail Code: 612
  • Greenbelt , MD 20771
  • Employer: NASA
  • Brief Bio

    Dr. Scott A. Braun, a research meteorologist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., specializes in the area hurricanes. Scott is an expert at using satellite and aircraft data, along with computer modeling, to investigate how hurricanes form and intensify, including their interaction with the Saharan Air Layer. Scott is the Project Scientist for the Earth System Observatory-Atmosphere Observing System (ESO-AOS), which is being developed in response to the 2017 NASA Decadal Survey Designated Observables for Aerosols and Clouds, Convection, and Precipitation. He is also project scientist for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission and the Time-Resolved Observations of Precipitation structure and storm Intensity with a Constellation of Smallsats (TROPICS, https://tropics.ll.mit.edu) mission.

    Scott was the Principal Investigator for NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HS3 was a five-year (2010-2015) mission specifically targeted to investigate hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean basin. In his role, Scott led a diverse team of hurricane and instrument scientists to design and conduct experiments using unmanned aircraft to understand better the meteorological conditions that favor storm formation and often lead to the development of major hurricanes. To learn more about HS3, visit: espo.nasa.gov/hs3.

    He was also the Project Scientist for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM, 2008-2018) and worked with the GPM mission project scientist during that time to lead NASA's efforts to improve precipitation measurement from space.

    Scott has a doctorate in atmospheric sciences from the University of Washington, Seattle, and a bachelor's degree in science, with a concentration in meteorology from San Francisco State University. He was a research assistant at the University of Washington in Seattle, Wash.; a Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colo.; and has worked at Goddard since 1997.

    Scott has received numerous awards including Fellow of the American Meteorological Society, the Goddard Earth Science Achievement Award, the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, and group achievement awards for participating in NASA's CAMEX-4, TCSP, GRIP, and HS3 missions.

    Research Interests

    Hurricanes

    Physical and dynamical processes in hurricanes related to storm formation, intensification, clouds, and precipitation

    Data Analysis

    Analysis of airborne datasets from NASA hurricane field campaigns (CAMEX-3, TCSP, NAMMA, GRIP, HS3) and of large satellite datasets including TRMM, GPM, MODIS, AIRS, and CALIPSO

    Modeling

    Numerical modeling (MM5 and WRF mesoscale models, Goddard Cumulus Ensemble Model) of cloud systems, including squall lines, hurricanes, and extratropical winter storms

    Current Projects

    Project Scientist for the Earth System Observatory-Atmosphere Observing System (ESO-AOS)

    The 2017 NASA Decadal Survey identified six designated observables representing the highest priority science goals for NASA Earth Science over the next 10 years, including Aerosols (A) and Clouds, Convection, and Precipitation (CCP). NASA conducted a 2-year ACCP study to explore a variety of architectures for a potential future mission to provide these measurements. The ACCP study team recommended a dual-orbit constellation that became ESO-AOS, with three satellites and 10 instruments. AOS is exploring additional international contributions from JAXA, CSA, and CNES. The project is currently in pre-Phase A, also known as the mission concept phase. The project is a multi-NASA center effort including GSFC, JPL, LaRC, MSFC, and ARC, along with multiple universities. 

    Project Scientist for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission

    The GPM mission is an international network of satellites that provide the next-generation global observations of rain and snow. Building upon the success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the GPM concept centers on the deployment of a “Core” satellite carrying an advanced radar / radiometer system to measure precipitation from space and serves as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites. Through improved measurements of precipitation globally, the GPM mission is helping to advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycle, improve forecasting of extreme events that cause natural hazards and disasters, and extend current capabilities in using accurate and timely information of precipitation to directly benefit society. For more information, see https://pmm.nasa.gov/GPM.

    Time-Resolved Observations of Precipitation structure and storm Intensity with a Constellation of Smallsats (TROPICS)

    TROPICS is an Earth Venture Instrument selected in 2016 to use a constellation of at least 6 CubeSat microwave radiometers to measure precipitation structure, storm intensity, and temperature and humidity profiles in and around tropical cyclones. The radiometers include 12 channels, with imaging channels at 90 and 205 GHz, 7 temperature channels near 118 GHz, and 3 moisture channels near 183 GHz. TROPICS will provide observations in the global Tropics (±40°) with a median revisit rate of 40 minutes. Scott is the project scientist for the mission. William Blackwell of MIT/Lincoln Labs is the PI.

    Positions/Employment

    1998 - Present

    Research Meteorologist

    NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD
    1997 - 1998

    Visiting Fellow

    Universities Space Research Association, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD
    1995 - 1997

    Advanced Study Program Postdoctoral Fellow

    NCAR, Boulder, CO
    1989 - 1995

    Research Assistant

    University of Washington, Seattle, WA

    Education

    1989 - B.A. in Science, concentration in meteorology, San Francisco State University
    1995 - Ph.D. in Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington

    Professional Societies

    American Meteorological Society (AMS), 1986 - Present
    Member, 1986-present Associate Editor, J. Atmos. Sci., 2009-present
    American Geophysical Union, 2006 - Present
    Member
    AMS, 2020 - Present
    Chair, AMS Committee on Tropical Meteorology and Tropical Cyclones
    AMS, 2020 - 2021
    Program chair, 4th Symposium on Tropical Meteorology and Tropical Cyclones, AMS Annual Meeting 2021
    AMS, 2018 - 2019
    Vice chair, AMS Committee on Tropical Meteorology and Tropical Cyclones
    AMS, 2016 - 2017
    Associate editor, Monthly Weather Review
    AMS, 2009 - 2015
    Associate Editor for the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences
    AMS, 2006 - 2007
    Program chair, AMS 12th Conference on Mesoscale Processes
    AMS, 2005 - 2010
    Member of the Mesoscale Processes Conference Committee
    AMS, 2005 - 2007
    Associate Editor for Monthly Weather Review

    Professional Service

    Missions

    2018-20 Goddard co-lead for the Decadal Survey Aerosols and Clouds, Convection, and Precipitation (ACCP) Targeted Observable study

    2019-20 Deputy principal investigator, Investigation of Microphysics and Precipitation in Atlantic Coast-Threatening Snowstorms (MPACTS) Earth Venture Suborbital mission

    2018 Project scientist, GOES-R Flight Project

    2016-17 Deputy project scientist, GOES-R Flight Project

    2008-17 Project scientist, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    2010-2014 Principal investigator, Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) Earth Venture Suborbital mission

    2005-07 Deputy project scientist, TRMM


    Research Community Service

    2021- International Advisory Committee for the Workshop on Atmospheric Satellites for Asian Monsoon cloud-precipitation Science and Applications (WASAMSA), February 2022, Bangalore, India.

    2015-16 Advanced Phased-Array Radar Advisory Panel

    2014-16 Advisor to NOAA Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology (SHOUT) program on application of the Global Hawk UAS for hurricane research

    2012-13 Member, Working Group for Unmanned Airborne System for Environmental Monitoring (NOAA/NASA/ONR)

    2008-12 Member, Working Group for Tropical Cyclone Research (NOAA/NASA/ONR)

    2008 Organizer, 3rd TRMM Science Conference

    2005-current Member, Earth-Sun Exploration Div. Science-Public Affairs Office Committee

    2005-06 Member, Joint Action Group for Tropical Cyclone Research (NOAA/NASA/ONR)

    2004 Max Eaton Award Committee member, 26th Conf. on Hurr. and Trop. Meteor.

    2002 NOAA Technology Infusion Plan, team member

    2000 Max Eaton Award Committee member, 24th Conf. on Hurr. and Trop. Meteor.


    Educational Service

    2017-19 PhD advisory committee for Robert Nystrom, Penn State University

    2011-13 Masters advisory committee for Alexandra St. Pe at Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore Co. (UMBC)

    2008-10 PhD advisory committee for Matthew Miller at North Carolina State University

    2006-11 Masters/PhD advisory committee for Samuel Trahan, UMBC

    2005-08 PhD advisory committee for Jason Sippel, Texas A&M University

    2004-07 PhD advisory committee for Joseph Olson, SUNY-Stony Brook

    Awards

    2019 Fellow, American Meteorological Society

    2016 NASA/USGS Pecora Award, TRMM Mission

    2007 NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal

    2006 Goddard Honor Award for Earth Science Achievement

    2001 Scientific Research Award, Laboratory for Atmospheres

    1989 Howard H. Hanks, Jr. Memorial Scholarship in Meteorology, AMS

    1989 School of Science Honoree, San Francisco State University (SFSU)

    Brief Bio

    Dr. Scott A. Braun, a research meteorologist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., specializes in the area hurricanes. Scott is an expert at using satellite and aircraft data, along with computer modeling, to investigate how hurricanes form and intensify, including their interaction with the Saharan Air Layer. Scott is the Project Scientist for the Earth System Observatory-Atmosphere Observing System (ESO-AOS), which is being developed in response to the 2017 NASA Decadal Survey Designated Observables for Aerosols and Clouds, Convection, and Precipitation. He is also project scientist for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission and the Time-Resolved Observations of Precipitation structure and storm Intensity with a Constellation of Smallsats (TROPICS, https://tropics.ll.mit.edu) mission.

    Scott was the Principal Investigator for NASA's Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3) mission. HS3 was a five-year (2010-2015) mission specifically targeted to investigate hurricanes in the Atlantic Ocean basin. In his role, Scott led a diverse team of hurricane and instrument scientists to design and conduct experiments using unmanned aircraft to understand better the meteorological conditions that favor storm formation and often lead to the development of major hurricanes. To learn more about HS3, visit: espo.nasa.gov/hs3.

    He was also the Project Scientist for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM, 2008-2018) and worked with the GPM mission project scientist during that time to lead NASA's efforts to improve precipitation measurement from space.

    Scott has a doctorate in atmospheric sciences from the University of Washington, Seattle, and a bachelor's degree in science, with a concentration in meteorology from San Francisco State University. He was a research assistant at the University of Washington in Seattle, Wash.; a Postdoctoral Fellow at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colo.; and has worked at Goddard since 1997.

    Scott has received numerous awards including Fellow of the American Meteorological Society, the Goddard Earth Science Achievement Award, the NASA Exceptional Scientific Achievement Medal, and group achievement awards for participating in NASA's CAMEX-4, TCSP, GRIP, and HS3 missions.

                                                                                                                                                                                            
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