Dr. Raphael Attie

Dr. Raphael Attie

  • Co Investigator for Solar Dynamics Observatory
  • Additional Roles:
  • 301.286.0360
  • NASA/GSFC
  • Mail Code: 671
  • Greenbelt , MD 20771
  • Employer: GEORGE MASON UNIVERSITY
  • Brief Bio

    I graduated with my master degree in France and with my PhD in Germany at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (Germany) which got me into solar physics and image processing. More precisely, I specialized into tracking optical flows from satellite imagery to infer plasma motion vectors.

    My first postdoc was at the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB, Brussels), where worked on long-term solar variations and used machine learning for the supervised classification of active regions. I was also in charge of the calibration pipeline of their three telescopes observing at high cadence and high resolution in H-Alpha, CaII and white light. I also volunteered to carry on the historical pen and paper method to draw sunspots and to calculate sunspot numbers and sunspot area.

    In 2016 I got awarded the fellowship of the Nasa Postdoctoral Program (NPP) at NASA/GSFC and have been working here at Nasa Goddard since January 2017. My main project is about characterizing the emergence of active regions and investigate new predictors for space weather forecasting. More recently I have started looking into new methods of Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning to improve my optical flow tracking framework which I seek to apply not only to observations of the solar surface but also to those of the entire heliosphere.

    I'm also into astrophotography and solar eclipse imagery. In my spare time I develop and share open source software for image processing in astronomy and solar astronomy.


    For more info:

    https://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/600/ECSS/Raphael-Attie.html

    Brief Bio

    I graduated with my master degree in France and with my PhD in Germany at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research (Germany) which got me into solar physics and image processing. More precisely, I specialized into tracking optical flows from satellite imagery to infer plasma motion vectors.

    My first postdoc was at the Royal Observatory of Belgium (ROB, Brussels), where worked on long-term solar variations and used machine learning for the supervised classification of active regions. I was also in charge of the calibration pipeline of their three telescopes observing at high cadence and high resolution in H-Alpha, CaII and white light. I also volunteered to carry on the historical pen and paper method to draw sunspots and to calculate sunspot numbers and sunspot area.

    In 2016 I got awarded the fellowship of the Nasa Postdoctoral Program (NPP) at NASA/GSFC and have been working here at Nasa Goddard since January 2017. My main project is about characterizing the emergence of active regions and investigate new predictors for space weather forecasting. More recently I have started looking into new methods of Artificial Intelligence and Deep Learning to improve my optical flow tracking framework which I seek to apply not only to observations of the solar surface but also to those of the entire heliosphere.

    I'm also into astrophotography and solar eclipse imagery. In my spare time I develop and share open source software for image processing in astronomy and solar astronomy.


    For more info:

    https://science.gsfc.nasa.gov/600/ECSS/Raphael-Attie.html

                                                                                                                                                                                            
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