Atousa Saberi

Atousa Saberi

  • PHD FELLOW
  • 301.614.6142
  • NASA/GSFC
  • Mail Code: 610.1
  • Greenbelt , MD 20771
  • Employer: NPP POST-DOC CONTRACT
  • Brief Bio

    Atousa studies the oceans using observations, theory, and modeling. She has specifically worked on kinematics and dynamics of dense overflows through sea-straits and how that impacts deep ocean circulation. She is currently at the GMAO office learning about the coupled ocean-atmosphere GEOS model and investigating potential sources of predictability in the ocean on seasonal time-scale.

    Research Interests

    Lagrangian analysis

    Rotating hydraulic control

    Climate Science

    Scientific data visualization

    Teaching Experience

    • Instructor:

    Atousa was fortunate to receive Johns Hopkins Dean's teaching fellowship. She designed and taught a course on the unifying theme for the Earth Sciences: Natural Hazards. She taught this course in the unique semester, fall 2020, when everyone was impacted by at least one type of hazard, the global pandemic. She wrote about her experience in the innovative instructor blog. Read more here: https://ii.library.jhu.edu/2021/06/10/the-hazards-of-teaching-for-the-first-time/

    • Teaching Assistant:

    Helped facilitating courses on physical oceanography, intro to sustainability and coastal processes.

    • Guest lecturer:

    Guest lectured in courses such as Earth & planetary fluid mechanics, covering topics on derivations of equations of fluid motion for geophysical fluids, and concepts such as Eulerian vs Lagrangian reference frames.



    Education

    Ph.D. in Earth and Planetary Sciences | Johns Hopkins University, 2022.

    M.Sc. in Ocean Engineering | Florida Institute of Technology, 2015.

    B.Sc. in Mechanical Engineering | Isfahan University of Technology, 2013.



    Publications

    Refereed

    Saberi, A., L. J. Pratt, T. W. Haine, and K. R. Helfrich. 2022. "Using hydraulic theory to monitor dense overflows in a parabolic channel." Journal of Physical Oceanography, (In Press)

    Saberi, A., T. W. Haine, R. Gelderloos, et al. M. Femke de Jong, H. Furey, and A. Bower. 2020. "Lagrangian Perspective on the Origins of Denmark Strait Overflow." Journal of Physical Oceanography, 50 (8): 2393-2414 [10.1175/jpo-d-19-0210.1]

    Saberi, A., and R. J. Weaver. 2016. "Simulating Tidal Flushing Response to the Construction of a Low-Crested Weir Connecting Port Canaveral to the Banana River, Florida." Journal of Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering, 142 (4): [10.1061/(asce)ww.1943-5460.0000337]

    Selected Public Outreach

    Science communication 5 / 2022 - 7 / 2022
    https://youtu.be/TJvjr9mVC10

    Atousa worked with Krieger School of Arts and Sciences to create a video for the World Ocean Day

    Brief Bio

    Atousa studies the oceans using observations, theory, and modeling. She has specifically worked on kinematics and dynamics of dense overflows through sea-straits and how that impacts deep ocean circulation. She is currently at the GMAO office learning about the coupled ocean-atmosphere GEOS model and investigating potential sources of predictability in the ocean on seasonal time-scale.

    Publications

    Refereed

    Saberi, A., L. J. Pratt, T. W. Haine, and K. R. Helfrich. 2022. "Using hydraulic theory to monitor dense overflows in a parabolic channel." Journal of Physical Oceanography (In Press)

    Saberi, A., T. W. Haine, R. Gelderloos, et al. M. Femke de Jong, H. Furey, and A. Bower. 2020. "Lagrangian Perspective on the Origins of Denmark Strait Overflow." Journal of Physical Oceanography 50 (8): 2393-2414 [10.1175/jpo-d-19-0210.1]

    Saberi, A., and R. J. Weaver. 2016. "Simulating Tidal Flushing Response to the Construction of a Low-Crested Weir Connecting Port Canaveral to the Banana River, Florida." Journal of Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering 142 (4): [10.1061/(asce)ww.1943-5460.0000337]

                                                                                                                                                                                            
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