Adrian Edward Southard

Adrian Edward Southard

  • Research Associate
  • 301.286.4457
  • NASA/GSFC
  • Mail Code: 699
  • Greenbelt , MD 20771
  • Employer: UNIVERSITIES SPACE RESEARCH ASSOCIATION
  • Brief Bio

    My graduate studies in the chemical physics program at University of Maryland enabled me to explore new material synthesis, deposition, and characterization methods. I have utilized this expertise to develop applications for both organic materials and new forms of carbon such as carbon nanotubes. I have also examined organic field-effect transistors to gain a deeper understanding of the charge transport mechanisms in organic materials.
    I have been working for Universities Space Research Association under the GESTAR cooperative agreement at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. I enjoy using my background in chemical physics to design, propose, test, and simulate instruments that will allow us to look for past and present habitable environments. 

     

    Research Interests

    Improving instrumentation for mass spectrometry.

    My research has focused on simulations and experiments with new instruments which all interface or support the use of a mass spectrometer in some way. Subject areas include charged particle optics, computation fluid dynamics, and heat transfer, All of this engineering aims to improve the sensitivity and capabilities of mass spectrometers to facilitate the detection of organics on Mars, comets,or icy moons in the solar system like Europa, Enceladus, and Titan.

    Current Projects

    Mars organic molecular analyzer Mass Spectrometer

    MOMA-MS aims to sample Martian soil as much as 2 meters deep and look for organics that may have survived exposure to radiation over billions of years. My focus is to provide the mass spectrometer with a  a fast response pressure gauge that will ensure its safe operation.

    Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces (OASIS)

    OASIS aims to detect amino acids on icy bodies in the solar system. By examinig the chirality of any detected amino acids, we can try to understand if life processes on Earth that favored the left-handed form of these acids were present on other planets or moons.

    In situ mineral composition analysis via xray spectroscopy.

    The mineralogy of planetary  surfaces is crucial in understanding the evolution of a planet.  The goal of this project is to develop higher resolution compositional maps of surfaces by bombarding the surface with high energy electrons so as to generate characteristics x-rays from the sample.

    Positions/Employment

    2011 - Present

    Scientist 1

    Universities Space Research Association, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Bldg. 34 S143

    Teaching Experience

    Teaching assistant of Introductory Physics at New College (1998)
    Teaching assistant at Univ. of Florida in Introductory Physics Lab (2000-2001)
    Teaching assistant at Univ. of Maryland in Introductory Chemistry Lab (2001-2002)

    Education

    Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Maryland College Park
    Bachelor of Arts in Physics from New College of Florida

    Professional Societies

    I am currently a member of ASMS (American Society of Mass Spectrometry) However, I've also been a member of APS and MRS., 2015 - Present

    Awards

    2012 IRAD Innovator of the Year Team Award

    Selected Publications

    Refereed

    Getty, S. A., J. P. Dworkin, D. P. Glavin, et al. M. G. Martin, Y. Zheng, M. A. Balvin, A. E. Southard, S. H. Feng, C. A. Kotecki, C. A. Malespin, and P. R. Mahaffy. 2013. "Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces: a Liquid Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer for Future in situ Small Body Missions." IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings,

    Getty, S. A., J. P. Dworkin, D. P. Glavin, et al. M. A. Balvin, C. Kotecki, A. E. Southard, and J. Ferrance. 2013. "In situ instrument to detect prebiotic compounds in planetary ices." SPIE Newsroom, [DOI: 10.1117/2.1201302.004703]

    Glavin, D. P., C. A. Malespin, I. Ten kate, et al. S. A. Getty, V. E. Holmes, E. Mumm, H. B. Franz, M. G. Noreiga, N. J. Dobson, A. E. Southard, S. H. Feng, C. A. Kotecki, J. P. Dworkin, T. Swindle, J. E. Bleacher, J. W. Rice, and P. R. Mahaffy. 2012. "Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith for Planetary Resource Exploration." IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings, 1-11, 3-10 [10.1109/AERO.2012.6187065]

    Brief Bio

    My graduate studies in the chemical physics program at University of Maryland enabled me to explore new material synthesis, deposition, and characterization methods. I have utilized this expertise to develop applications for both organic materials and new forms of carbon such as carbon nanotubes. I have also examined organic field-effect transistors to gain a deeper understanding of the charge transport mechanisms in organic materials.
    I have been working for Universities Space Research Association under the GESTAR cooperative agreement at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. I enjoy using my background in chemical physics to design, propose, test, and simulate instruments that will allow us to look for past and present habitable environments. 

     

    Selected Publications

    Refereed

    Getty, S. A., J. P. Dworkin, D. P. Glavin, et al. M. G. Martin, Y. Zheng, M. A. Balvin, A. E. Southard, S. H. Feng, C. A. Kotecki, C. A. Malespin, and P. R. Mahaffy. 2013. "Organics Analyzer for Sampling Icy Surfaces: a Liquid Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer for Future in situ Small Body Missions." IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings

    Getty, S. A., J. P. Dworkin, D. P. Glavin, et al. M. A. Balvin, C. Kotecki, A. E. Southard, and J. Ferrance. 2013. "In situ instrument to detect prebiotic compounds in planetary ices." SPIE Newsroom [DOI: 10.1117/2.1201302.004703]

    Glavin, D. P., C. A. Malespin, I. Ten kate, et al. S. A. Getty, V. E. Holmes, E. Mumm, H. B. Franz, M. G. Noreiga, N. J. Dobson, A. E. Southard, S. H. Feng, C. A. Kotecki, J. P. Dworkin, T. Swindle, J. E. Bleacher, J. W. Rice, and P. R. Mahaffy. 2012. "Volatile Analysis by Pyrolysis of Regolith for Planetary Resource Exploration." IEEE Aerospace Conference Proceedings 1-11, 3-10 [10.1109/AERO.2012.6187065]

                                                                                                                                                                                            
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