Michael J Kurylo

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Michael J Kurylo

  • SR RESEARCH SCIENTIST
  • 301.614.5144
  • NASA/GSFC
  • Mail Code: 614
  • Greenbelt , MD 20771
  • Employer: Science Collaborator
  • Brief Bio

    Dr. Kurylo joined GEST/UMBC in 2008 and GESTAR/USRA in 2011 as a senior research scientist following his retirement from NASA Headquarters where he was a Program Manager and Program Scientist in atmospheric composition.  Prior to joining NASA, he was a research chemist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) where he led a laboratory research group in atmospheric kinetics and photochemistry.  As manager of NASA's Congressionally-mandated Upper Atmosphere Research Program he was largely responsible for organizing and implementing numerous airborne scientific investigations that linked the depletion of stratospheric ozone to manmade chemicals containing chlorine and bromine.  He has provided similar leadership for other field studies utilizing measurements from satellites, aircraft, balloons, and the ground for examining the connections between changes in atmospheric composition and dynamics and those in climate.  Since 1987 he has served at the interface between scientific research and international environmental policy through extensive participation in national and international scientific assessment activities, most notably in each of the Scientific Assessments of Ozone Depletion conducted under the auspices of the United Nations Environment Programme and the World Meteorological Organization.  He has been elected Chair of the past several meetings of Ozone Research Managers of the Parties to the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and has reported the recommendations from these forums at the subsequent joint meetings of the Parties to the Vienna Convention and its Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.  As an internationally acclaimed atmospheric research scientist and program manager, Dr. Kurylo has received numerous awards and recognitions.  These include the Department of Commerce Bronze and Silver Medals, two NASA Exceptional Service Medals, the NASA Cooperative External Achievement Award, 16 NASA Group Achievement Awards, the Catholic University of America Alumni Achievement Award in the Field of Science, the National Oceanic and Atmosperic Administration Environmental Hero Award, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award, the Hillebrand Prize of the Chemical Society of Washington / American Chemical Society, and induction into the NIST Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Scientists, Engineers, and Administrators.  His efforts in leading to the success of the Montreal Protocol have been acknowledged by his being named to the Montreal Protocol Who's Who listing.  Dr. Kurylo holds leadership positions on several international organizations in atmospheric chemistry.

    Awards

    National Research Council / National Academy of Sciences Research Associateship – (1969 – 1971)

    U.S. Dept. of Commerce Bronze Medal – (December 1983) for Superior Federal Service for significant contribution to the study of the kinetics of chemical reactions.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (March 1991) for the outstanding accomplishments of and contributions to the 1989 Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition conducted in Stavanger, Norway.

    U.S. Dept. of Commerce Silver Medal – (October 1991) for Meritorious Federal Service for leadership in providing a scientific basis for understanding the effects of manmade chemicals on the Earth’s atmosphere.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (March 1995) for the outstanding accomplishments of and contributions to the 1994 Airborne Southern Hemisphere Ozone Experiment / Measurements for Assessing the Effects of Stratospheric Aircraft conducted in Christchurch, New Zealand.

    United Nations Environment Programme Certificate of Recognition – (September 1995) for contributions to the 1994/1995 Assessment of the scientific, environmental, and technological and economic aspects of the protection of the ozone layer.

    NASA Exceptional Service Medal – (May 1996) for outstanding leadership of the Upper Atmosphere Research Program within NASA’s Mission to Planet Earth.

    Catholic University of America Alumni Achievement Award in the Field of Science – (November 1996) for distinguished scientific research and management.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (May 1998) for the outstanding accomplishments of and contributions to the 1997 Photochemistry of Ozone Loss in the Arctic Region in Summer aircraft and balloon campaign conducted in Fairbanks, Alaska.

    United Nations Environment Programme Certificate of Recognition – (June 1999) for contributions to the 1998 Scientific, Environmental Effects, and Technological and Economic Assessments under the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Hero Award – (April 2000) for tireless efforts to preserve and protect the Nation’s environment.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (June 2001) for the successful development of the Earth Science Enterprise Research Strategy 2000-2010.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (July 2001) for the outstanding accomplishments of and contributions to the 1999/2000 SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE) aircraft and balloon campaign conducted in Kiruna, Sweden.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (October 2001) as a member of the Aerosol and Polar Stratospheric Cloud Lidar Team for exceptional achievement in the design, development, and implementation of a new airborne aerosol and polar stratospheric cloud lidar system.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (May 2003) for the outstanding accomplishments of and contributions to the 2002 Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers – Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) aircraft and ground-based campaign based in the Florida Everglades region.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (August 2003) for the outstanding accomplishments of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE III) Team.

    NASA Certificate of Appreciation – (February 2004) for outstanding contribution to the Southern Hemisphere Additional Ozonesondes (SHADOZ) project.

    NASA Ames Research Center Honor Award – (September 2004) for outstanding management of the Upper Atmosphere Research Program and for leadership of airborne research campaigns to study stratospheric chemistry and dynamics.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (May 2005) for exceptional scientific achievement during the second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE-II) aircraft and balloon campaign conducted in Kiruna, Sweden during the 2002/2003 winter.

    NASA Peer Award – (July 2005) for outstanding scientific program management and leadership within the Earth-Sun System Division of the Science Mission Directorate.

    NASA Acquisition Improvement Award – (September 2005) as a member of the Sponsored Research and Education Support Services Acquisition Team for outstanding achievement in source selection activities and furtherance of acquisition streamlining initiatives. This is the highest NASA acquisition award.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (April 2006) in recognition of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite Team accomplishments that have provided a heightened understanding of the natural and human-made influences on the middle atmosphere.


    NASA Group Achievement Award – (June 2006) for exceptional achievement associated with the successful development, high altitude balloon flight, and recovery of the Far Infrared Spectroscopy of the Troposphere (FIRST) instrument.

    NASA Cooperative External Achievement Award – (November 2006) for leadership and coordination across Federal agencies, international bodies, and the international scientific community on atmospheric composition research.

    William T. Pecora Award – (December 2006) as a member of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer Team for developing innovative techniques for providing unique atmospheric ozone, sulfur dioxide, and aerosol measurements for more than 25 years.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (May 2007) for exceptional achievements in the successful development, launch, and operation of the Meteor 3M / SAGE III satellite.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (May 2007) for exceptional achievements in the successful development, launch, and operation of the CALIPSO satellite.

    Academy of Athens Honorable Mention – (December 2007) for long term involvement and achievements in the protection of the ozone layer.

    United Nations Environment Programme Letter of Recognition – (January 2008) for contributions to the scientific and technical reports that earned the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize shared with AI Gore.

    NASA Exceptional Service Medal – (May 2008) for leadership of the Upper Atmosphere Research Program including coordination of laboratory, ground-, balloon-, and airborne-measurement programs.

    US Environmental Protection Agency Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award – (May 2008) in recognition of exceptional contributions to global environmental protection and for outstanding scientific contributions to stratospheric ozone layer protection.

    Montreal Protocol Who’s Who Listing – (January 2009) for significant scientific and management efforts leading to the success of the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (February 2009) for exceptional scientific achievement during the Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4) aircraft and balloon campaign conducted in San Jose, Costa Rica during the July - August 2007.

    Hillebrand Prize of the Chemical Society of Washington / American Chemical Society – (March 2009) for exceptional scientific achievement over an extended career in laboratory research, international assessments, and program management in the field of atmospheric science. This is the highest award given by the Chemical Society of Washington.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (April 2009) for outstanding accomplishments in the successful Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) mission in Alaska and Canada.

    NASA Group Achievement Award – (April 2009) for the successful completion of the Newly Operating and Validated Instruments Comparison Experiment (NOVICE), the “first of its kind” innovative flight test program for airborne earth science instruments.

    United Nations Environment Programme Certificate of Recognition – (September, 2012) for valuable contributions to the Scientific Assessment Panel activities for the Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion 2010.

    NDACC Steering Committee Certificate of Appreciation – (October, 2012) for tireless efforts in support of long-term atmospheric monitoring as “Founding Father” of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change (NDSC) and Chair / Co-Chair of the NDSC and the current Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC) for more than two decades.

    NIST Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Scientists, Engineers and Administrators – (October, 2015) for leadership in the measurement and critical evaluation of gas phase kinetics, photochemical, and spectroscopic data of trace atmospheric chemical species related to the ozone layer and environmental change.

    Brief Bio

    Dr. Kurylo joined GEST/UMBC in 2008 and GESTAR/USRA in 2011 as a senior research scientist following his retirement from NASA Headquarters where he was a Program Manager and Program Scientist in atmospheric composition.  Prior to joining NASA, he was a research chemist at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) where he led a laboratory research group in atmospheric kinetics and photochemistry.  As manager of NASA's Congressionally-mandated Upper Atmosphere Research Program he was largely responsible for organizing and implementing numerous airborne scientific investigations that linked the depletion of stratospheric ozone to manmade chemicals containing chlorine and bromine.  He has provided similar leadership for other field studies utilizing measurements from satellites, aircraft, balloons, and the ground for examining the connections between changes in atmospheric composition and dynamics and those in climate.  Since 1987 he has served at the interface between scientific research and international environmental policy through extensive participation in national and international scientific assessment activities, most notably in each of the Scientific Assessments of Ozone Depletion conducted under the auspices of the United Nations Environment Programme and the World Meteorological Organization.  He has been elected Chair of the past several meetings of Ozone Research Managers of the Parties to the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and has reported the recommendations from these forums at the subsequent joint meetings of the Parties to the Vienna Convention and its Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer.  As an internationally acclaimed atmospheric research scientist and program manager, Dr. Kurylo has received numerous awards and recognitions.  These include the Department of Commerce Bronze and Silver Medals, two NASA Exceptional Service Medals, the NASA Cooperative External Achievement Award, 16 NASA Group Achievement Awards, the Catholic University of America Alumni Achievement Award in the Field of Science, the National Oceanic and Atmosperic Administration Environmental Hero Award, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Stratospheric Ozone Protection Award, the Hillebrand Prize of the Chemical Society of Washington / American Chemical Society, and induction into the NIST Portrait Gallery of Distinguished Scientists, Engineers, and Administrators.  His efforts in leading to the success of the Montreal Protocol have been acknowledged by his being named to the Montreal Protocol Who's Who listing.  Dr. Kurylo holds leadership positions on several international organizations in atmospheric chemistry.

                                                                                                                                                                                            
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