Do Hyuk Kang

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Do Hyuk Kang

  • RESEARCH SCIENTIST
  • 301.614.6569
  • NASA/GSFC
  • Mail Code: 617
  • Greenbelt , MD 20771
  • Employer: UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
  • Brief Bio

    After finishing Geography degree at Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, Dohyuk Kang "DK" attended Colorado State University in Ft. Collins, CO majored in hydrology in Civil and Environmental Engineering in 2005. Since then, snow research has been his topics including an implementation of snow-subroutine within a large framework hydrology model, a testing of L-band snow sensor, and a coupling of a multi-layer snow model with a microwave emission model. Last two were conducted during his Ph.D. at Duke university from 2005 to 2010. Postdoctoral research was followed since Ph.D. both at University of Northern BC and University of Washington to broaden his snow topics to large-scale hydrology model to evaluate snowmelt contribution to runoff in western Canadian watershed, the Fraser River owing to 20th's century's climate change. Since 2014, he has been a NASA postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Edward Kim. Currently, he is preparing a future snow mission organized by NASA including pre-launch campaigns and retrieval algorithms for terrestrial snow.

    Research Interests

    Linking Snow Hydrological Processes supported by Snow Remote Sensing Technologies

    • Continental scale snow modeling with an aid of snow remote sensing
    • Quantitative assessments of snow hydrological processes adapted with remote sensing
    • Instrumentation of soil moisture and snowpack monitoring
     

    Positions/Employment

    10/2016 - Present

    Research Scientist

    ESSIC, University of Maryland, College Park, Greenbelt, MD

    SnowEx: NASA’s multi-year airborne projects aimed at the best suite of remote sensing for a terrestrial snow
    Regional scale NASA GSFC’s Land Information System (LIS) with a collaboration with K-Water in S. Korea

    6/2014 - 9/2016

    NASA Postdoctoral Fellow

    ORAU and USRA for 2nd year, Greenbelt, MD

    Investigating snow physical properties using microwave signatures

    2/2012 - 5/2014

    Postdoc

    University of Northern BC, Prince George, BC, Canada

    Applying VIC model into Fraser River Basin, British Columbia to investigate long-term hydrological responses driven by 20’th century climate change

    Education

    Ph.D. in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Duke University, NC, September, 2005 – December, 2010
    Advisor: Dr. Ana P. Barros
    Dissertation Topics:
    I. System testing of radio frequency sensor to in-situ snowpack measurements
    II. Multi- layer coupled snow hydrology and microwave forward model to investigate microwave signatures of snowpack

    M.S. in Civil and Enviornmental Engineering, 2005, Colorado State University, CO, August, 2003 – December, 2005
    Advisor: Dr. Pierre Y. Julien
    Dissertation Topic:
    I. Temperature index snowmelt model implementation in watershed scale applied to California Gulch, CO

    Awards

    2014-2016 NASA Postdoctroal Fellowship administered by Universities Space Research Association, $120,000 + $16000 travel use

    2006-2009 NASA Earth System Science Graduate Student Fellowship titled with Characterization of the Physical Properties of the Snowpack at Very High Resolution using RF Wireless Grids and Downscaling of Satellite-Based Estimates of Snow Water Equivalent total $81,000

    Grants

    11/01/2016 - 03/31/2019 International Collaborative R&D Program, Korea Water Resources Company (K-Water)

    Application of NASA GSFC’s Land Information System (LIS) to cope with water hazards in Korea

    ; PI ; 0.5 FTE
    Grant Amount: $458,608

    Brief Bio

    After finishing Geography degree at Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea, Dohyuk Kang "DK" attended Colorado State University in Ft. Collins, CO majored in hydrology in Civil and Environmental Engineering in 2005. Since then, snow research has been his topics including an implementation of snow-subroutine within a large framework hydrology model, a testing of L-band snow sensor, and a coupling of a multi-layer snow model with a microwave emission model. Last two were conducted during his Ph.D. at Duke university from 2005 to 2010. Postdoctoral research was followed since Ph.D. both at University of Northern BC and University of Washington to broaden his snow topics to large-scale hydrology model to evaluate snowmelt contribution to runoff in western Canadian watershed, the Fraser River owing to 20th's century's climate change. Since 2014, he has been a NASA postdoctoral fellow with Dr. Edward Kim. Currently, he is preparing a future snow mission organized by NASA including pre-launch campaigns and retrieval algorithms for terrestrial snow.

                                                                                                                                                                                            
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