Andrew Robert Inglis

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Andrew Robert Inglis

  • POST DOC
  • 301.286.4557
  • NASA/GSFC
  • Mail Code: 671
  • Greenbelt , MD 20771
  • Employer: CATHOLIC UNIV OF AMERICA
  • Brief Bio

    After obtaining his PhD in Physics from the University of Warwick in 2009, Dr Inglis joined Goddard Space Flight Center in 2010 as a NASA Postdoctoral Fellow in the Solar Physics Laboratory. Dr Inglis primarily worked on RHESSI observations, in combination with other Heliophysics instruments. In 2012 Dr Inglis joined the Catholic University of America as a Research Associate, in which role he remains based at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. His specialties include solar X-ray, EUV and radio observations, time-domain analysis of solar phenomena, waves and pulsations in the solar corona, and flare energetic processes. In recent years, his interests have expanded to include magnetospheric waves and stellar flares. Dr Inglis served as a developer of the SunPy project, serving on the board between 2013 – 2017. He also served as a co-investigator for the FIERCE medium explorer and FOXSI small explorer mission concepts. He has co-authored more than 40 publications in top astrophysics journals, achieving an h-index of 21.

    Research Interests

    Solar flare energy release

    Solar flares are among the most energetic phenomena in the solar system. Flares directly heat plasma to millions of degrees and simultanesouly accelerate large numbers of particles. A fundamental goal in heliophysics is to understand the fine details of flare energy release, including when and where energy release occurs, the balance between thermal and nonthermal processes, and the nature of periodic or oscillatory phenomena during flares.

    The solar-stellar connection

    Observed stellar flares are typically hundreds or thousands of times more energetic than their solar counterparts. Despite the very different size and magnitude scales involved, stellar flares often exhibit similar properties to solar ones. This indicates the presence of similar underlying physics. Connecting connections between solar and stellar observations can allow us to better understand other stars, and also the potential impacts on exoplanet habitability.

    Waves in the magnetosphere

    Waves are a commonly observed feature in all areas of Heliophysics, but particularly in the Earth's magnetosphere. These waves can take many forms, with each informing us as to the underlying physical processes occurring around the Earth. By studying the distributions of these waves in time and space, we can better understand our near-Earth environment.

    Current Projects

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI)

    The Solar Data Analysis Center (SDAC)

    Solar Orbiter / SPICE

    Space Precipitation Impacts (SPI) team

    Education

    • PhD, Physics, University of Warwick, 2009
    • MPhys, Physics, University of Warwick, 2006

    Awards

    • NASA Robert H. Goddard Honor Award for Science, 2021
    • NASA/GSFC Heliophysics Science Division Peer Award, 2015
    • NASA Group Achievement Award, RHESSI Science Team, 2013

    Brief Bio

    After obtaining his PhD in Physics from the University of Warwick in 2009, Dr Inglis joined Goddard Space Flight Center in 2010 as a NASA Postdoctoral Fellow in the Solar Physics Laboratory. Dr Inglis primarily worked on RHESSI observations, in combination with other Heliophysics instruments. In 2012 Dr Inglis joined the Catholic University of America as a Research Associate, in which role he remains based at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. His specialties include solar X-ray, EUV and radio observations, time-domain analysis of solar phenomena, waves and pulsations in the solar corona, and flare energetic processes. In recent years, his interests have expanded to include magnetospheric waves and stellar flares. Dr Inglis served as a developer of the SunPy project, serving on the board between 2013 – 2017. He also served as a co-investigator for the FIERCE medium explorer and FOXSI small explorer mission concepts. He has co-authored more than 40 publications in top astrophysics journals, achieving an h-index of 21.

                                                                                                                                                                                            
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