Jeremy David Schnittman

Photo of JEREMY SCHNITTMAN

Jeremy David Schnittman

  • RESEARCH AST, FIELDS AND PARTICLES
  • 301.286.8069
  • NASA/GSFC
  • Mail Code: 663
  • Greenbelt , MD 20771
  • Employer: NASA
  • Brief Bio

    Jeremy joined the Astrophysics Science Division as a civil servant in 2010, coming all the way from Baltimore, MD, where he spent three years as a Chandra postdoctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include theoretical and computational modeling of black hole accretion flows, X-ray polarimetry, black hole binaries, gravitational wave sources, gravitational microlensing, planetary dynamics, resonance dynamics, and exoplanet atmospheres. He has been described as a "general-purpose astrophysics theorist," which he regards as quite a compliment. Jeremy works closely with members of the X-ray Astrophysics and Gravitational Astrophysics Labs on the GEMS and LISA/SGO missions, and his office is conveniently located between them.

    Positions/Employment

    2010 - Present

    Research Astrophysicist

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD
    2007 - 2010

    Chandra Postdoctoral Fellow

    Johns Hopkins University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Baltimore, MD
    2005 - 2007

    Postdoctoral Fellow

    University of Maryland, Physics Department, College Park, MD

    Education

    2005: PhD in physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    1999: BA in physics, Harvard University

    Research Interests

    Research Projects

    • Modeling X-ray spectra from black hole accretion flows
    • Electromagnetic counterparts to binary black hole mergers
    • Dark matter annihilation around black holes
    • Resonant dynamics of planetary systems and analogs
    • Modeling exoplanet atmospheres

    Brief Bio

    Jeremy joined the Astrophysics Science Division as a civil servant in 2010, coming all the way from Baltimore, MD, where he spent three years as a Chandra postdoctoral fellow at the Johns Hopkins University. His research interests include theoretical and computational modeling of black hole accretion flows, X-ray polarimetry, black hole binaries, gravitational wave sources, gravitational microlensing, planetary dynamics, resonance dynamics, and exoplanet atmospheres. He has been described as a "general-purpose astrophysics theorist," which he regards as quite a compliment. Jeremy works closely with members of the X-ray Astrophysics and Gravitational Astrophysics Labs on the GEMS and LISA/SGO missions, and his office is conveniently located between them.

                                                                                                                                                                                            
    NASA Logo, National Aeronautics and Space Administration