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STEREO Shows Comet ISON Approaching the Sun

These SDO images from 7:25 p.m. EST on Feb. 24, 2014, show the first moments of an X-class flare in different wavelengths of light -- seen as the bright spot that appears on the left limb of the sun. Hot solar material can be seen hovering above the active region in the sun's atmosphere, the corona.

Press Releases & Feature Stories

Best Evidence Yet For Coronal Heating Theory Detected by NASA Sounding Rocket

08.01.2014
Scientists have recently gathered some of the strongest evidence to date to explain what makes the sun's outer atmosphere so much hotter than its surface.

Peering through the Layers

07.28.2014
This collage of images shows an active region on the Sun taken at almost the same time in four wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light (July 24, 2014 at about 17:56 UT).

NASA's SDO Observes a Lunar Transit

07.28.2014
On July 26, 2014, from 10:57 a.m. to 11:42 a.m. EDT, the moon crossed between NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit.

Spun and Confused

07.23.2014
A long arch of plasma (called a prominence) was pulled this way and that by magnetic forces for a week before it finally dissipated (July 10-16, 2014).

Spots Galore

07.18.2014
The Sun sported a whole slew of sunspots over the last 11 days (July 1-10, 2014). Sunspots are darker, cooler regions on the Sun created by intense magnetic fields poking through the surface.
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Overview

The Solar Physics Laboratory works to understand the Sun as a star and as the primary driver of activity throughout the solar system. Our research expands knowledge of the Earth-Sun system and helps to enable robotic and human exploration.

We develop innovative instruments and mission concepts, theoretical models, and techniques to access and analyze data. The Laboratory provides project scientists for NASA missions, assists with strategic planning and mission definition, and communicates research results to the international scientific community and the public.

Contact Us

Susan M Hendrix
301.286.7745

General inquiries about the scientific programs at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center may be directed to the Office of Communications at 1.301.286.8955.

                                                                                                                                                                                        
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