X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory (662) Home

Press Releases & Feature Stories

RXTE Reveals the Cloudy Cores of Active Galaxies

02.19.2014
Using data from the RXTE satellite, an international team has uncovered a dozen instances where X-ray signals from active galaxies dimmed as a result of a cloud of gas moving across our line of sight.

NASA Sees 'Watershed' Cosmic Blast in Unique Detail

11.21.2013
On April 27, a blast of light from a dying star in a distant galaxy became the focus of astronomers around the world.

Suzaku Study Points to Early Cosmic 'Seeding'

10.30.2013
Most of the universe's heavy elements, including the iron central to life itself, formed early in cosmic history and spread throughout the universe, according to a new study.

Astronomers Uncover a 'Transformer' Pulsar

09.25.2013
An international team of scientists using a fleet of orbiting X-ray telescopes, including NASA's Swift and Chandra X-ray Observatory, has discovered a millisecond pulsar with a dual identity.

Science Outreach Reaches In

07.23.2013
Some 60 scientists, researchers, interns and outreach personnel manned stations for the annual Science Jamboree at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., on July 16.
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Laboratory News

Cutting Edge

04.24.2013
NICER/SEXTANT and Super-TIGER are featured in Volume 9, Issue 3 (Spring 2013) of the Cutting Edge
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Overview

The X-ray Astrophysics Laboratory conducts investigations of a broad range of astronomical systems through detection and analysis of their X-ray emission and other radiation they emit. Objects studied range from nearby solar system objects to cosmological structures. Researchers at the Laboratory investigate the physics of extreme environments?such as those near the event horizons of black holes?and the evolution of stars, galaxies, and large-scale structures.

The Laboratory is the preeminent developer of state-of-the-art X-ray astronomical detectors and optical systems for performing precise spectroscopy, polarimetry, timing, and imaging. These instruments have been employed in numerous suborbital applications (sounding rockets and balloons) and orbiting observatories.

Read a history of X-ray astronomy at Goddard.

Contact Us

Dr. Robert Petre
301.286.3844
Project Scientist [662]
Chief [662]
                                                                                                                                                                                        
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