Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics (614) Home

For further information, data, research, and other resources, see Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Research.


Featured Video

Press Releases & Feature Stories

Ozone-Depleting Compound Persists, NASA Research Shows

08.20.2014
NASA research shows Earth's atmosphere contains an unexpectedly large amount of an ozone-depleting compound from an unknown source decades after the compound was banned worldwide.

Change in the Air

08.19.2014
Contributing to millions of premature deaths each year, air pollution is one of the world’s greatest environmental health risks.

A Ten-Year Endeavor: NASA’s Aura and Climate Change

07.17.2014
Celebrating its tenth anniversary this week, NASA’s Aura satellite measures climate agents, including greenhouse gases, clouds and dust particles.

An Aura of Success

07.16.2014
On the 10th anniversary of the launch of NASA's Aura spacecraft, we offer 10 examples of how the satellite has changed our view of dust, pollution, aerosols, and ozone in our atmosphere.

Ten-Year Endeavor: NASA’s Aura and the Ozone Layer

07.16.2014
Scientists rely on data from NASA's Aura satellite to observe ozone in Earth's atmosphere.
See all Press Releases & Feature Stories »

Laboratory News

There are no Laboratory news items at this time.

More Laboratory News »

Overview

The Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics Laboratory studies the ozone layer, a responsibility the Clean Air Act assigns to NASA. In addition, there is increasing concern about the global aspects of tropospheric pollution, and the coupling between chemical composition and climate.

One of the Laboratory's principal missions is to understand the behavior of stratospheric ozone and trace gases that influence ozone. Ozone and trace gases such as methane, nitrous oxide, and the chlorofluorocarbons profoundly influence Earth's habitability.

The Laboratory also studies the processes that control the composition of Earth's troposphere, the impact of human activity on global atmospheric pollution, and the impact of climate change on future concentrations of stratospheric ozone and tropospheric gases.

Contact Us

Jose Rodriguez
301.614.5736
jose.m.rodriguez@nasa.gov

General inquiries about the scientific programs at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center may be directed to the Center Public Affairs office at 1.301.286.8955.

                                                                                                                                                                                        
NASA Logo, National Aeronautics and Space Administration