Climate and Radiation (613) Home

The Climate and Radiation Laboratory investigate atmospheric radiation, both as a driver for climate change and as a tool for the remote sensing of Earth's atmosphere and surface. The Laboratory research program seeks to better understand how our planet reached its present state, and how it may respond to future drivers, both natural and anthropogenic.

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Press Releases & Feature Stories

Plumes from Alaska's Pavlof Volcano

11.17.2014
The Alaska Volcano Observatory first detected earthquakes associated with the movement of magma and heat at Pavlof's summit on November 12, 2014.

Seasons of Indian Air Quality

11.14.2014
The skies over the Indo-Gangetic Plain—a river valley that includes parts of Pakistan, India, Nepal, and Bangladesh—are among the haziest in the world.

Earth Matters Blog: Iceland's Holuhruan: Still Erupting

11.14.2014
In some ways, the ongoing fissure eruption at Holuhraun lava field in Iceland is an ideal one.

Mýrdalsjökull Then and Now

11.13.2014
More than half of Iceland's numerous ice caps and glaciers sit near or directly over volcanoes, meaning fire and ice sometimes unite.

Calling All Cloud-Loving Citizen Scientists

11.05.2014
Cloud lovers—and really, who doesn’t love to look at clouds—take note. With your camera and computer, you can contribute to an effort to improve understanding of how clouds affect Earth’s climate.
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Overview

The Climate and Radiation Laboratory seeks a better understanding of Earth's climate on all time scales, from daily, seasonal, and interannual variability through changes on geologic time scales. Our research focuses on integrated studies of atmospheric measurements from satellites, aircraft and in-situ platforms, numerical modeling, and climate analysis.

We investigate atmospheric radiation, both as a driver for climate change and as a tool for the remote sensing of Earth's atmosphere and surface. The Laboratory research program strives to better understand how our planet reached its present state, and how it may respond to future drivers of change, both natural and anthropogenic.

Contact Us

Cathy L Newman
301.614.6183
Administrative Analyst [613]

General inquiries about the scientific programs at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center may be directed to the Center Public Affairs office at 1.301.286.8955.

                                                                                                                                                                                        
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